Watercolor sketches for a stained glass window of the Nativity and windows of St. Anthony of Padua and Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

Installation in progress

 

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The art of making stained glass windows has changed little over the past hundreds of years.  Granted, the kilns used to fire the stained glass might be gas powered today, but the methods used to produce fine windows remain unchanged.

We start first with your idea for a new window for your church, home, or institution. We determine size and scale considerations along with frame and installation details.  After discussing design ideas, colors and styles, we produce a watercolor sketch for your approval.  This will be a scale drawing in color a good representation of the final product. Changes and adaptations are made in this stage before we produce a full size cartoon in black and white of the window that shows every detail of the subject, every small nuance, shape, and shade. 

Pictured above is a portion of a window of Christ stilling the Tempest. Immediately above and to the right are larger details of the same window.

Here we show twelve windows created for a Boston church in genuine antique glass. In six pairs, the parish selected these popular saints to be represented pictorially in their church. We have shown detail of the window of St. Maximilian Kolbe above and below, and detail of the faces of St. Joseph, and St. Frances Xavier Cabrini.

 

Let us design and execute Stained Glass windows for your church. Please contact us with your inquiry. We are happy to serve you.

Call or Email Richard Chartrand. He will respond quickly to your requests.

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This cartoon becomes the working drawing to create the finished window. Individual glass pieces are selected for color and painted accordingly. Each piece is fired in the kiln individually and then assembled on the table, cemented and soldered together to make a complete panel.

Above is a reduced section from a full size cartoon of a window. This shows every detail of the painted design in black and white, with placement of all lead lines.

To the right is a photo of a full size cartoon. The white "H" shaped lines represent the frame muntins.

Since 1910, the Chartrand family has been involved with stained glass windows for churches. In the early days, we represented the firm Maumejéan Frères of Paris, France and Mayer Studios of Munich, Germany. Our association with Mayer continues today. Our lead artist of many years, Franz Schroeder, continues our work at their studio in Munich. Click here for a partial  list of the many stained glass projects that the Chartrands have completed in the last one-hundred years.
Here we show five examples of a series of stained glass windows that we designed and executed for an Armenian Church. The beautiful style is very fitting to the Armenian tradition.
Above we have windows of the Holy Family, Saint Vartanatz, two narrow panels from stairwells in the church - and shown to the left the window of the Ascension with a detail of the Christ figure.

We are able to create windows suitable for your church, keeping in mind the architectural style of your building and the spiritual tradition of the congregation.

For a church south of Boston, we designed sixty stained glass windows, each representing a different saint.  We illustrate just a few of them here.

These sixty windows have beautifully detailed figures on backgrounds of almost transparent antique glass. This method allows for plenty of natural light to enter the church and permits the exterior landscaping to be viewed from the nave.